Posts Tagged ‘eco’

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Technology and Words Changing First Nations – Right or Wrong?

25/08/2012

I was offered the opportunity to participate in an Ontario Power Authority initiative  – Giibimidowing Gidakiiminaan – Keeping, Respecting & Caring For Our Land Treaty #3 Conference – August 21 – 23, 2012 in Kenora, Ontario at which I jumped readily.  It was my opportunity to motivate, encourage & talk about possibilities – in renewables, but even beyond.

My dealings with First Nations, in the past, have taught me that I am but a stranger, an outsider to them.  How would I know anything about who they are or how they live?  Perception & reality are significantly different in my books.  However, I always make it a point to speak from the heart and this opportunity was no exception.

So off I flew to Thunder Bay where I met some of the other speakers and together we set off by car to Kenora, Ontario.

Trees, grass, water.  Clean air. True blue skies.  Not like the haze many have grown to become accustomed to in the Greater Toronto Area.

Sunset in Kenora, Ontario – beautiful, priceless

However, this area is not without its environmental – economical – technological – societal problems, quite the contrary.  Another type of unhealthy haze has been inflicted, and it is one that separates us huge concentration of southerners from the realities & truths of those living in the true north (which people in Kenora laugh and say they consider themselves in the south of the the north!).

Kenora, Ontario, some 5 hours drive from Thunder Bay – 3 hours drive from Winnipeg, Manitoba, lies in Treaty #3 First Nations area.  Unfamiliar with Treaty #3 and its’ important historical significance in Canada?

“Treaty 3 was an agreement entered into on October 3, 1873, by the Ojibway Nation and Queen Victoria. The treaty ceded a vast tract of Ojibway territory, including large parts of what is now northwestern Ontario and a small part of eastern Manitoba, to the Government of Canada. Treaty 3 also provided for rights for the Métis and other Ojibway, through a series of adhesions signed over the next year.

It was the third in a series of eleven numbered treaties between the Crown and North American First Nations. Despite being the third of these treaties it is in fact more historically significant in that its text and terms served as the model for the remainder of the numbered treaties. Treaties 1 and 2 covered an area about the same size and in fact had to be amended to reflect some of the developments arising out of the negotiation of Treaty 3. At the time that it was negotiated it was anticipated that the terms of Treaty 3 would serve as a model for future treaties and would require the amendment of Treaties 1 and 2 [Letter from Minister of the Interior Campbell to Lieutenant-Governor Morris, 5 August 1873, Public Archives of Canada (“PAC”), RG10, vol. 1904].

Treaty 3 has particular historical significance because of the litigation that ensued between the Crown in Right of Ontario and the Crown in Right of Canada over the significance of the treaty and the respective roles of Canada and the provinces in relation to aboriginal peoples. The first of these cases is the St. Catharines Milling v. The Queen [(1888), 14 App. Cas. 65 (P.C.)] which dealt with the question of the ownership of lands subject to a treaty (a question that was decided in favour of the Province). The second, A.G. (Canada) v. A.G. (Ontario), [(1910) A.C. (P.C.)], dealt with the question of whether or not Ontario had to indemnify Canada for the expenses incurred in negotiating the treaty and the ongoing costs of fulfilling the treaty obligations. Canada lost this case as well with the Supreme Court of Canada and the Privy Council holding that Canada was responsible for Indian affairs and the welfare of Indians and that the treaty had been negotiated to achieve broad national purposes (such as the building of the transcontinental railway) rather than to benefit Ontario. The significance of these decisions is still a matter of discussion in the Canadian courts.

Treaty 3 is also significant as there exists a written record of the native peoples understanding of the treaty. This is known as the Paypom document. It is a series of notes that were written for Chief Powassin during the treaty negotiations, and documents the promises that were made to the First Nations people. The promises in the Paypom document differ in a number of ways from the printed version available from the Canadian government.” – wikipedia

As a result, First Nations has no trust in outsiders and their talk about this and about that.  Not just with this treaty, but with a number of ‘agreements’ and/or ‘contracts’ and/or ‘initiatives’, many First Nations takes the stance that others don’t live up to their end of the ‘bargains’.  This is not to say there are no First Nations people who develop trust or ally themselves with others, however, they do with much caution.  In either case, I don’t blame them.

Making a long story short, I spoke my presentation from the heart and managed to connect with many, like Willy – a 74 year old elder, who has been attending all kinds of meetings and gatherings about the community, “… since 1981.” he said.

“I’m not afraid of progress. But.  There is a right way and a wrong way of doing it.” he almost whispered at me, as his aged wise eyes looked at me, the breeze blowing about his straw coloured, long hair.

Willy, an Elder from Treaty #3 has been attending community meetings since 1981.

First Nations Treaty #3 has a number of issues that are affecting their communities, and in no small manner.

3 hydro electric dams stand at the centre of much controversy.  First Nations describe how the frogs have disappeared.  No longer do the sturgeon grow.  In September of 2011, Grand Council Treaty #3 filed an application for judicial review. Respondents are the Province of Ontario as represented by the Ontario Ministry of Energy and the Ontario Power Authority (OPA).  The main issue at the centre of this review is the Respondents failure to perform their “duty to consult” in good faith with First Nations.

“… the Ontario Energy Minister’s direction to the OPA to develop the Hydroelectric Contract Initiative (HCI) without Aboriginal consultation. In question is the OPA’s development and implementation of the  HCI, the decision by OPA to enter into an HCI contract for existing hydroelectric generating facilities (Calm Lake, Sturgeon Falls, Fort Frances, Kenora, and Norman) in Treaty 3 territory with ACH Limited Partnership (ACH). As of May 2011, these dams are owned by Calgary based BluEarth Renewables Inc.” – GCT3  (Please read here for full text)

Sounds as though, once again, people are not living up to their ends of ‘bargains’ … and so the cycle continues.

How about the proposed ‘solution’ of dumping toxic nuclear waste into the communities up there?  (Click here for full text of story.)  Nuclear Waste Management was on the agenda for the discussions as well.  Their displays, which likely cost thousands and thousands of dollars, took a whole day to put up, I watched it.  They were complicated, showed large pictures of business people and were overwhelming, even for me.

In no way is this an effective way of communicating to First Nations … and again, the cycle continues.

There’s more.

In December of 2011, Treaty #3 launched an education lawsuit against the federal government – the reason? ” … a breach of their treaty right to education.”

Inexperienced teachers & disintegrating schools.  Yes, it’s real and not fixed, even if Mike Holmes has drawn attention to the appalling living conditions, as he did in his December 2011 CBC article entitled, “Stop building junk on reserves.”

And if that doesn’t get you, let’s just go deeper down the rabbit hole and talk about how shocking Pikangikum truly is.

If you have never heard of this place, you need to.

In 2000, this First Nation was given the horrible and terribly sad title of, “Highest Suicide Rate in the WORLD” (I used wikipedia as a reference, but that info is not complete & certainly paints a picture leaning toward female inhalant abuse. It’s way more than that, affecting all.)  And, it hasn’t stopped.

In fact, this area is especially worse than ever.

I met a local from the area who shall remain nameless, due to the sensitivity of this information.

In March of 2012, MacLean’s published a story called, “Living and dying in Pikangikum.”  While it does speak to the horrors of life up in the area, it surely isn’t giving up the whole picture.

Picture a home, barely a structure, empty. No beds, no appliances, nothing.  A First Nations woman, standing in the middle of it, with utter desperation in her eyes.

Where to get another $500.00 together for just one more tab of Oxycontin.

Yes, comfortable ladies and gentlemen, reading this online, having encountered this sad article somehow through the internet because you are able to.

One tab of Oxy goes for $500.00, usually split into 4 – so 1/4 tab per person at $125.00.

How about a mickey?  A mickey of alcohol is $250.00.

Who controls all this?  I won’t write it out loud, but they surely are not angels.

We should all be ashamed of ourselves, allowing such injustices to continue to First Nations.  In fact, one of the Elders, a ‘Grandma’ said,

“First it was smallpox.  Now this.  Why not just give them smallpox and be done with it.”

It is not right to have our eyes shut for us to this, or for us to shut our eyes to it ourselves.

So, if you didn’t know about all this, dig deep.

Go even deeper and talk to First Nations.  What?  You can’t or don’t know how to? That’s bull. Keeping us separate is an excellent way to keep the cycle of abuse going.  I have and no, I don’t always believe everything … whether it’s from the government or from First Nations.  But I have observed this now myself having been there and there is no denying that while technology can most definitely be used to improve the quality of all of our lives, it has also become apparent that it can also create great problems that cannot be swept under the rug: it’s as simple as having the power to transport in drugs and alcohol to remote locations and turn viable people into zombies walking around ghost towns, as some really evil people are capitalizing on the genocide of a people.

But don’t believe me.  As I said, go find out for yourself.  And if you do not find this sad, shocking, angering, then perhaps all is lost and we live in a soul-less, money loving people filled country.

I hope that some of you reading this can connect even more dots in between with the mind-bending and twisted way some of our communities are merely being given perceptions, words & stories that makes the “jobs & prosperity” buzz over resources & technologies sound so great.

If we have such wonderful communication technologies, how come we seem to have difficulty in communicating, educating, negotiating & consulting with First Nations?  If guns kill people, spoons are making Harper fat.

It is also my hope that heartfull, responsible people will step-up and champion the introduction of new ways that are right, to the benefit of our communities and the children of our future.

But what do I know?

OPA Conference for Treaty #3 – Youth & Elders Forum

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Niagara Waste Systems – Used Roofing Shingles Buried in Landfill – Study

13/10/2011

Word has been received from Walker Industries.  I sent an email in order to determine what happens to one waste product, namely used roofing shingles: recycled or not? The answer is no.

Used Roofing Shingles are BURIED in Niagara's Landfill

The roofers were absolutely correct.  Now the brain must try to absorb the exponential amount of just used roofing shingles that must exist, buried, like a deep dark secret.

As we continue desiring green energy, renewable, clean tech and all those other goodies that make our eyes sparkle, our consciences feel better, are we forgetting the immense and exponentially grown and continuously growing pile of  just one waster product that does not bio-degrade?

There is a much deeper story here and it is one I intend to get to the bottom of, literally.

Technology and desire exists.  In the next posts, I hope to start figuring out the barriers.

Here is the communication (in reverse order, most recent to first):

Good morning,

At the drop-off, all shingles are dumped directly into a roll off bin
and then sent to Niagara Waste Systems for landfill disposal.

Taylor

—–Original Message—–
//////////////////////////////////
Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2011 11:51 AM
To: Taylor Webb
Subject: RE: Walker Ask Us a Question Form

Thank you for your response, Mr. Webb.

I believe I have to rephrase the question.

What does your facility do with the used shingles (policy, procedure,
environmental procedure?) after they have been
dumped off by residents and commercial/contractors?

I hope this is clearer.

I thank you in advance for your knowledgeable reply.

Sincerely,

Niagara Falls Resident

> Good afternoon,
>
> We accept shingles at a rate of $66.50/metric tonne for both residents
> and contractors. You will be weighed on the inbound and outbound
scale
> and your disposal fee will be based on your weight. We have a $10
> minimum charge.
>
> Our facility is open 8am to 5pm, Monday through Saturday.
>
> If you have any other questions, feel free to call me at 905-680-3059.
>
> Thanks and have a great day!
>
> Taylor
>
>
>
> —–Original Message—–
////////////////////////////////////////////
> Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2011 10:02 AM
> To: contact weg
> Subject: Walker Ask Us a Question Form
>
>
> On Oct-12-2011 (10:01:46 AM), the following individual filled out the
> Ask Us a Question form:
>
> First Name: x
> Last Name: xxxxxxxxxxx
> Phone: xxxxxxxxxxx
> Fax:
> Email Address: ///////////
>
> Hello! I am a home-owner in Niagara Falls (Montrose Road). I was
> wondering if you could please tell me your policy and procedures for
> used shingle (roofing) disposal when dropped off both by residential
and
> commercial/industrial?
>
> Thank you for your assistance.
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Niagara Falls Resident

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Organic Week rolls out across Canada

13/10/2011

OTTAWA, Oct. 13, 2011 /CNW/ – Canada celebrates the second annual Organic Week from October 15-22, with hundreds of event partners and participating retailers showcasing organic products across the country.

OrganicWhether you’re a farmer, a food manufacturer or a good old-fashioned eater, you’re invited to join the organic harvest celebration: from film screenings and special menus in restaurants across the country, to community feasts and winery tours, to food-security meetings and organic tastings at farmers markets and retailers, both large and small. Find events in your area by visiting the Organic Week website: www.OrganicWeek.ca.

“Organic Week is a party we’re throwing for everyone who loves good, wholesome organic food, and who cares about the environment,” said Organic Week co-organizer Matthew Holmes, of the Canada Organic Trade Association (COTA). “Today it’s easier than ever to find organic products, with the new Canada Organic logo and mandatory standards overseen by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Organic Week is a way of raising awareness that good things grow in Canada.”

Organic Week has also organized a special contest for people wanting to share some of their best organic ideas: the Organic Breakfast Challenge is open to anyone in Canada who has a great recipe, picture, or memory of “Mom’s favourite” meal. A winner will be selected every day during Organic Week and will receive a basketful of great organic goodies and coupons from participating companies. Anyone can enter from the Organic Week website or Facebook page.

COTA and the Canadian Organic Growers are grateful for the generous donors that make Organic Week possible: Canadian Health Food Association, Earthbound Farms, Good Food Revolution, Manitoba Harvest, Mill St. Brewery, Nature’s Path Foods, Organic Meadow, Southbrook Winery, TD Friends of the Environment Foundation, Whole Foods Markets, Ambrosia Organic Apple Growers, Beau’s All Natural Brewing, Beretta Organics, Canadian School of Natural Nutrition, Front Door Organics, Grainworks Ltd., Homestead Organics, Horizon Organic Dairy, Nature’s Fare Markets, Oikos Organic Greek Yogurt, Ontario Natural Food Co-op, Organic Agriculture Centre of Canada, Poplar Grove, Silk Soy Beverage, SunOpta, Taste of Nature, The Big Carrot and Wholesome Sweeteners.

The Canada Organic Trade Association (COTA) is the membership-based business association for organic agriculture and products in Canada. Its members include growers, shippers, processors, certifiers, farmers’ associations, distributors, importers, exporters, consultants, retailers and others. COTA’s Board of Directors is democratically elected by its members. COTA’s mission is to promote and protect the growth of organic trade to benefit the environment, farmers, the public and the economy.

For further information:Matthew Holmes
(613) 482-1717

Organic Week website: www.OrganicWeek.ca
Organic Week on Facebook: www.Facebook.com/organicweek
Organic Breakfast Challenge: www.Facebook.com/organicweek
Organic Week on Twitter: www.twitter.com/organicweek
Organic Week event hashtag: #oweek

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Video from Green Flight Challenge, Full Scale Electric Power Aircraft Competition

12/10/2011

See the amazing aircraft of the Green Flight Challenge (GFC) from the Google Green Flight Challenge Exposition hosted by NASA at Moffett Field held Monday October 3, 2011. The event showcased the latest in personal aircraft innovation and featured advanced vehicle demonstrations.

Day 2: Green Flight Challenge

Info on Green Flight Challenge

Cutting-edge technology companies exhibited close by to the aircraft. Products and technologies were demonstrated and displayed (advanced vehicles and innovations).  Some of the exhibitors:

  • Verticopter – Personal VTOL
  • D-STAR Engineering – Electric Motor featuring 8kw/kg
  • Sinhatech – Laminar Flow
  • Motor Excellence – Motors
  • GSE – Bio-Fuel Engines
  • Kleenspeed – Car and Aero Technolgies
  • JoBy Energy – Electric VTOL
  • A.I.R. Inc. – Motor Controllers
  • Google – Autonomous Automobile
  • NASA – The Future of Aeronautics
  • CAFE – GFC Flight Testing
  • Extreme Capacitor, Inc. – Ultra-Capacitors, X-CapTM
  • Alternair – Electric Aircraft
  • Catto Props – Quiet Propellers
  • Sentry View Systems – Data Acquisition
  • Wrightspeed – Electric Drivetrains
  • Synergy – Synergy aircraft
  • Aerovel – Flexrotor UAV
  • IKE Aerospace – Seraph Aircraft
  • Brammo Inc – Electric Motorcycle
  • Matternet – UAV Last-Mile Solutions
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Not Recycled! Study: Used Roofing Shingles Disposal in Niagara, Ontario – Environment Heads Buried in Landfill

12/10/2011

Had a discussion with a local roofer & scrapper from the Niagara Falls area.

The first thing he told me when he found out I am a sustainability consultant is that used roofing shingles in this area are simply buried in the landfill.

No recycle. No program. Nothing.

Since my focus recently has been looking at legislation & impacts of it across not only Ontario and Canada, but pretty much the entire globe, that I sometimes tend to forget about my own backyard.

I simply cannot overlook and ignore what this local small business owner had to say.

So this is where my daily study on simply one product, used roofing shingles and their disposal procedures in Niagara (& Ontario) begins.  The vision at the end of the day is to have secured some type of logical procedure to recycle & clean-up that which has already been compromised, namely the Walker Industries landfill here in Niagara Falls.

My discussion with this local roofer led me to his father, an 83 year old gentleman, who served on the Niagara Falls City Council and has been privy to much knowledge about the goings on in the environment of Niagara and Ontario.  This very knowledgeable, experienced man has pointed to the watershed destruction & compromise that has occurred as a result of shingle burial (combined with other un-biodegradeable junk) at the landfill site, affecting the townships surrounding it.  He spoke of having once approached the City to have an incineration technology put in to deal with it (a number of years ago) but that this had been dismissed.

Now it’s homework time.

1) Shingles: traditional ingredients; any scientific data available

2) Walker Industries: owns biggest landfill in Ontario; list of policies and procedures re: used shingles; description or copy of future plans

3) Understanding the local law, local traditions, local politics (OMG!) & their effects;

4) Research into history of environment of area and surrounding areas; any scientific data available

5) Creating a plan, proposal and/or solution; research into effective shingle recycling programs; research into potential of small business creation

The probability that these 5 first areas will expand into more is high.  Ask a question, get an answer = 100 more questions.

Please stay tuned and join me in observing, researching & perhaps even changing how one waste product, used roofing shingles, are disposed of in Niagara and Ontario.

But what do I know? 🙂

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Wind Power Without Blades: Images of New Technology

22/09/2011

Wind Power Without Blades: Images of New Technology

22/09/11 via Discovery News – Noise from wind turbine blades, inadvertent bat and bird kills and even the way wind turbines look have made installing them anything but a breeze. New York design firm Atelier DNA has an alternative concept that ditches blades in favor of stalks. Resembling thin cattails, the Windstalks generate electricity when the wind sets them waving. The designers came up with the idea for the planned city Masdar, a 2.3-square-mile, automobile-free area being built outside of Abu Dhabi. Atelier DNA’s “Windstalk” project came in second in the Land Art Generator competition a contest sponsored by Madsar to identify the best work of art that generates renewable energy from a pool of international submissions.

The proposed design calls for 1,203 “stalks,” each 180-feet high with concrete bases that are between about 33- and 66-feet wide. The carbon-fiber stalks, reinforced with resin, are about a foot wide at the base tapering to about 2 inches at the top. Each stalk will contain alternating layers of electrodes and ceramic discs made from piezoelectric material, which generates a current when put under pressure. In the case of the stalks, the discs will compress as they sway in the wind, creating a charge.
“The idea came from trying to find kinetic models in nature that could be tapped to produce energy,” explained Atelier DNA founding partner Darío Núñez-Ameni.
In the proposal for Masdar, the Windstalk wind farm spans 280,000 square feet. Based on rough estimates, said Núñez-Ameni the output would be comparable to that of a conventional wind farm covering the same area.
“Our system is very efficient in that there is no friction loss associated with more mechanical systems such as conventional wind turbines,” he said.

Each base is slightly different, and is sloped so that rain will funnel into the areas between the concrete to help plants grow wild. These bases form a sort of public park space and serve a technological purpose. Each one contains a torque generator that converts the kinetic energy from the stalk into energy using shock absorber cylinders similar to the kind being developed by Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Levant Power .
Wind isn’t constant, though, so Núñez-Ameni says two large chambers below the whole site will work like a battery to store energy. The idea is based on existing hydroelectric pumped storage systems. Water in the upper chamber will flow through turbines to the lower chamber, releasing stored energy until the wind starts up again.

The top of each tall stalk has an LED lamp that glows when the wind is blowing — more intensely during strong winds and not all when the air is still. The firm anticipates that the stalks will behave naturally, vibrating and fluttering in the air.

“Windstalk is completely silent, and the image associated with them is something we’re already used to seeing in a field of wheat or reeds in a marsh. Our hope is that people living close to them will like to walk through the field — especially at night — under their own, private sky of swarming stars,” said Núñez-Ameni.

After completion, a Windstalk should be able to produce as much electricity as a single wind turbine, with the advantage that output could be increased with a denser array of stalks. Density is not possible with conventional turbines, which need to be spaced about three times the rotor’s diameter in order to avoid air turbulence. But Windstalks work on chaos and turbulence so they can be installed much closer together, said Núñez-Ameni.

Núñez-Ameni also reports that the firm is currently working on taking the Windstalk idea underwater. Called Wavestalk, the whole system would be inverted to harness energy from the flow of ocean currents and waves. The firm’s long-term goal is to build a large system in the United States, either on land or in the water.

source: Discovery News, Alyssa Dangelis

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Traceability Technology Introduced in Canada For Tracking Sustainable Food – Ocean to Plate

21/09/2011

Sobeys Inc. launches traceability system to track seafood from ocean to plate

Customers can now trace the journey of their seafood purchases back to the fisherman who caught it, where and how

MISSISSAUGA, ON, Sept. 21, 2011 via /CNW/ – Sobeys Inc. is launching a sustainable seafood traceability system today to provide Canadians with unprecedented visibility into the quality and sustainability of the seafood they eat. Through a partnership with Ecotrust Canada’s Thisfish™ traceability program, customers can now trace a variety of fresh seafood products and frozen Sensations by Compliments seafood right back to the fisherman who caught it, the boat it was caught from, the fishing area where the catch took place and the fishing method used.

Traceability Technology for Food“Sobeys Inc. is proud to be the first Canadian grocery retailer to offer an innovative and comprehensive seafood traceability system that focuses on more sustainable sources and allows customers to verify the authenticity and quality of their seafood purchases,” says David Smith, Vice President, Retail Strategy and Sustainability. “It not only provides Canadians with a robust set of information about the source of their seafood, it directly connects them to the fishermen that catch their fish.”

Through the transparency that seafood traceability provides, customers are able to understand where their seafood comes from, make informed decisions about their seafood purchases and be confident in knowing that the products they buy were caught and handled using responsible fishing practices and processes.

Tracking Food From Ocean to Plate

From oceans to dinner plates, traceable seafood products are uniquely coded and tracked from the time they are caught through to their journey to Sobeys Inc. stores to give customers a behind-the-scenes, full-access look into their seafood purchase: its origin, preparation tips and delicious recipes, photos of the boat and crew, the captain’s logbook, as well as information about Sobeys Inc.’s sustainability initiatives. Customers even have the option to send a note directly to the fisherman that caught their fish.

Traceable seafood products are available at Sobeys stores across the country, as well as Thrifty Foods and IGA stores in Western Canada.

The traceable frozen Sensations by Compliments lineup includes sustainable seafood products certified by the Marine Stewardship Council:

  • Sensations by Compliments Wild Sockeye Salmon Fillets
  • Sensations by Compliments Wild Pacific Halibut Fillets
  • Sensations by Compliments Wild Albacore Tuna Portions
  • Sensations by Compliments Wild Black Cod Fillets

The assortment of traceable fresh seafood varies by store based on regional and seasonal availability.

Powered by and in partnership with Ecotrust Canada, customers can trace their fresh seafood by inputting a unique code found on the product packaging on www.thisfish.info. On traceable Sensations by Compliments seafood, customers will find a unique code to input on www.compliments.ca/madewithcare and a QR code to scan using a smartphone.

In addition to its consumer benefits, the fishermen who proudly stand behind their seafood products are encouraged by the opportunities that this traceability system provides and are inspired to take even greater measures to ensure the sustainability of their fishing practices.

“As fishermen, it’s great for my crew and me to realize that somebody around the world is buying our fish, and that they can look at who we are and where we come from,” says Vic Amos, B.C. Fisherman. “Traceability goes back to high quality and sustainability goes back to accountability, so it’s important for me to ensure that I fish sustainably and deliver a high-quality product, too.”

“Sobeys is committed to helping to ensure the long-term viability of seafood and will continue to look for opportunities to provide customers with the information they need to make informed purchase decisions and to further the cause of responsible seafood sourcing,” adds Smith.

Sobeys Inc.’s sustainable seafood traceability system is part of a larger effort the Company is undertaking in actively promoting seafood sustainability. For more information about Sobeys’ Sustainable Seafood Policy, please visit www.sobeyscorporate.com/sustainability.

via CanNewsWire

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